Writing Feed

Events Where I Will Be Speaking

For one whole week in July, it's a 24/7 Lisa channel here in the River City. Or so it seems to me; I've been in introvert mode since the teaching professorship wrapped at the end of May, so stepping out for two public-speaking events in one week feels like a big deal.

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First, PixelPop Festival is a two-day event in St. Louis, Missouri, "celebrating unique games and the people who make them possible." It's the cornerstone conference for a growing local gaming community comprised of a few highly successful start-ups, a major game studio's satellite office, and loads of energetic entrepreneurs and students of game design.

This is one of the reasons I returned to my roots--because I saw this happening.

The past year has been a pretty much near-constant barrage of nostalgia and memory triggers as I've done what people say you can't do: gone home again. PixelPop is no exception. It takes place at my alma mater, St. Louis University, in the student center, a building that served as a sort of "third place" during my undergrad years at SLU. I saw Maya Angelou speak there, and fittingly, I lost a friend to the card game Magic there when he defected from our convo group to join a daily meetup of players. (In retrospect, I should've joined 'em.)

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Here's my session abstract:

In this interactive session, Lisa Brunette draws on her decade-long career focus in narrative design and game writing to tackle a thorny question that really shouldn’t be so thorny: Why does story matter? You’ll design your own game narrative and come away with do’s and don’ts based on a wealth of development experience across hundreds of games.

There's more info on Facebook, and here's where you can find the full schedule. My talk is Sunday.

St. Louis County Library

Like I said, THE VERY SAME WEEK, I'm also speaking at a St. Louis County Library branch, as part of their "Science in St. Louis" series. I know, right? I'm all science-y.

Here's that session abstract:

"The Rock, Paper, Scissors Phenomenon!" Using a simple hand game as a starting point, participants will learn fundamentals of game design and storytelling in this interactive experience led by a 10-year game industry veteran.

And the Facebook event page.

What are YOUR plans for the summer? Exciting career moves? Public escapades? Feel free to promote them in the comments below.

 


What Would You Like to Read on the Blog?

 

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Image courtesy of Pixabay.

It's been a while--since January, actually--since I've posted on the blog, and for that I apologize.

Long story short, I've struggled with what amounted to two full-time jobs for the past year, since I took that visiting professorship at Webster University, AND AT THE SAME TIME, MY INDIE GAME STUDIO BLEW UP. Don't get me wrong; this is a good problem to have these days. But when your priority list exceeds the number of hours in a given week, some things need to drop off, and sadly, this blog was one of them. 

But I've missed it. And you--its reason for being. As I look ahead to hopefully a more life-balanced rest of the year, I'm mulling over what this blog should and shouldn't be, and I'd love to get your opinion. So I created a survey.

It's short. Survey Monkey tells me you can take it in two minutes. If you've got two minutes to spare, please weigh in on the types of topics and guests you'd like to see on the blog.

The survey is completely anonymous. I'm not collecting any data on who fills it out or when or why or what your first-born child's name is, I promise. I will analyze the results in the aggregate and pay attention to any "other" comments you've written, no names or strings attached.

And if you'd rather share your opinion in the comment section below this post, feel free. The survey asks general questions about reading and gaming habits and interests, and then basically asks what you'd like to see here on the blog in the future. I'm all ears. Thank you!

In case you missed that survey link above, here's a button! Go ahead and push it! Or click on it! Just go there!

 

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A Love Story in 27 Characters or Less

 

My latest game project was more like writing poetry than anything else. GSN Games asked me to create a love story for their popular game series, Bingo Bash. Here's the catch: The entire story had to fit into the tiny space inside a bingo room, and that meant each line had to be only 27 characters or less.

The room is called "Dear Diary," and it tracks the ups and downs of Linda, a floral shop owner. She's the type of woman who vows to do something nice for someone else every day... like paying for a stranger's Chinese takeout. Linda doesn't expect anything in return and leaves the scene before the recipient of her gift realizes it. But fate puts them at the same bingo night soon after... will romance bloom? Or will Linda's on-again, off-again boyfriend get in the way? Find out by unlocking the room and reading Linda's diary each time you level up!

It was a challenge to write a micro-plot, especially since I had to work with pre-existing art assets, and timing only allowed for small tweaks. I handled it by asking the awesome GSN team to add conflict elements to the diary images, which to me is the core of any story. I also sketched out the story beats first and then wrote Linda's diary entries from that, cutting back on some details to fit the smaller space.

I've written within a set character count many times in my decade in the game industry, but this was the tiniest. Composing within a strict limitation like that teaches you to, as the venerable writer's guide Strunk & White proclaims, "omit needless words." It's a great exercise in economy.

Which is why I chose to start my first-ever "Narrative Design and Game Writing" course this semester by asking my students to do the same. I made it a bit easier by leaving the theme and accompanying artwork open-ended. I couldn't share any of the details of my GSN Games project with them anyway, so I simply asked them to write a love story within the same space restrictions. They embraced the project and delivered on a wide range of stories, from two involving rocks (!) to a play on the idea of lovebirds to more serious fare, such as domestic abuse. Many described the project as presenting an opportunity for great creativity within the limitation. Some said it took them into more poetic language and compared it to haiku.

"Dear Diary" is available as part of the Bingo Bash app for iOS and Android and is free to play, with in-app purchasing. I'd love to hear what you think of the story; please comment below.

Dear Diary