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February 2017

What's the Motive? Martha Crites

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Debut author Martha Crites is a fellow finalist for the Nancy Pearl Book Award. She handles the tricky topic of mental illness with great care and intelligence in her mystery novel Grave Disturbance. Here she discusses how motive can shift and change over the course of the writing project.

Martha Crites:

Lisa asks, “What’s the Motive?”

I can only answer, “Motives change.” 

Did I intend to take on the stigma of mental illness when I wrote my first mystery, Grave Disturbance? Not at all. I just wanted to see if I could write a novel. So, in the time-honored tradition of write what you know, I gave my sleuth a job in the mental health field, like me. Not my exact job, but one a little more exciting. Grace Vaccaro is a mental health evaluator who sees people in the field to determine if they need to be hospitalized as a danger to self or others. I now know that writing a novel is a big project, and my motives have changed over time. 

Here’s what happened: When Grave Disturbance was first published, I found myself, like all new authors, needing a little elevator speech to tell about my book. Something like: After a filmmaker working on a documentary about native land rights is murdered, mental health professional Grace Vaccaro realizes that a woman she evaluated may have been a witness. Grace and Liz must sift truth from delusion to unmask the murderer before he kills again.

I had no idea that I would observe the stigma of mental illness first hand when I began to mention my protagonist’s career as a mental health evaluator. People became quiet and uncomfortable at the topic. So, I gave a lot of thought to how to talk about it and decided to mention the issue of stigma up front, at the beginning. Somehow, it helped my listeners find a new lens through which to view the story. 

Since Grave Disturbance came out, I often give presentations at libraries. We talk about how I wanted to portray Liz, the character with mental illness, as fully human, a person with talents and hopes, dreams and disappointments. But more than that, I tell them about my current novel-in-progress, which is now taking the stigma head on. I tell stories about the inspiration for a character in my work-in-progress: Marsha Linehan, the University of Washington therapist who bravely faced stigma by telling the story of her own illness to the New York Times after years of silence.

The result? Now instead of silence, audience members ask questions about psychosis, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and more. They tell me about their experiences with family members. We have a conversation I never anticipated, a conversation that is helping me form my second Grace Vaccaro novel with a much clearer idea of my motive.

What I love about the mystery genre is that it can combine entertainment with important issues like mental health, homelessness, and the history of treatment of Native Americans in our region–all in a fast-paced novel that keeps the reader turning pages. And afterward we can talk about it.

Review Grave Disturbance on Amazon or Goodreads

Follow Martha Crites on Facebook or Twitter

  Marthacrites

Martha Crites has worked in community and inpatient mental health field for twenty years and taught at the Quileute Tribal School on the Washington coast. Grave Disturbance was a finalist for the 2016 Nancy Pearl Award. 


New Release! Blog Tour! The Dreamslippers Series Boxed Set

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It's happened. The entire Dreamslippers Series is out in the world as one tome.

That's all three novels in one fat ebook.* PLUS a bonus novella "prequel" that explores Amazing Grace's past.

The series centers on the question, "What if you could slip into the dreams of a killer?" This family of PIs can, but that isn't easy.

In Cat in the Flock, the first book, readers meet apprentice dreamslipper Cat McCormick, who moves to Seattle from the Midwest so she can train with her Grandmother Grace. The septuagenarian trailblazer is a dreamslipping pro, having used it to solve crimes as a PI. But Cat gets more than she bargained for as Grace puts her through her New Age paces, with yoga and meditation on the agenda. However, Cat gets drawn back to the Midwest when she discovers a prominent church leader stalking a woman and girl on the run.                                     

In book two, Framed and Burning, Grace pops for a trip to Miami to visit her brother Mick for Art Basel, which should also lift Cat's spirits. But when Mick's studio goes up in flames, and he won't give an alibi, the dreamslippers must defend one of their own.

The third book, Bound to the Truth, takes place in Seattle, with all three dreamslippers under one roof. An up-and-coming architect is found dead, and her wife Robin thinks she knows who did it. But Cat and Grace aren't sure they can trust the grieving widow's claims.

Included in the ebook boxed set is a bonus novella that answers key questions readers have asked about Amazing Grace: How did she get her name? What happened when her daughter Mercy was born? And did Grace really go undercover inside a cult?
 
The first two books won the indieBRAG medallion, and the second book was a finalist for the Nancy Pearl Book Award and a RONE Award nominee.
 
All three novels are for sale in print locally (near me) at Book ’n’ Brush in Chehalis, and the ebooks are available everywhere ebooks are sold, for any device. 

Buy Links:

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Look for giveaways, guest posts, and more all this week for the blog tour! Free ebooks, audiobooks, and paperbacks to the winners. Here's the first tour stop.

And here's the full tour schedule.

*The ebook clocks in at 262,920 words.  


Upcoming Appearance: 'The Reporter and the Story' at AWP

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This week I'll be in D.C. presenting at the Associated Writing Programs Conference, now celebrating its fiftieth anniversary. AWP provides support, advocacy, resources, and community to nearly 50,000 writers, 550 college and university creative writing programs, and 150 writers’ conferences and centers. I've wanted to attend this conference since I was a creative writing student working toward my Master of Fine Arts degree back in 2000. But the demands and focus of my full-time career have always been higher priorities. So I'm thrilled to finally get the chance, 17 years later.

I'm honored to be included on a panel with four women whose bios will knock your socks off. Our topic: "The Reporter and the Story: How Journalism Can Inform, and Fund, a Literary Career."

While most days it seems I'm heavier on the inform part of this equation than the fund, I'm excited to share my experiences as a freelance journalist for twenty-plus years, from writing on the arts and literature back in my home town of St. Louis, to the bootstrap days with a big-time Seattle startup, to the regular feature articles I now write for a small-town newspaper. These real-life stories have always fed my fictional storytelling.

Here's the full panel description, followed by bios for each presenter. Check out their web sites--you're bound to discover a new favorite author on this list.

Description

Hemingway, Orwell, Dickens—all worked as journalists before becoming celebrated novelists. In addition to building your platform and paying the bills, working as a reporter can make you a better poet, novelist, or memoirist. Five journalists talk about how reporting on others drives them to create better fictional characters, how radio reporting has helped them develop their authorial voice, and how daily deadline gigs can lead to a career as a narrative nonfiction author.

Bios

Jessica Langlois

Jessica Langlois is a Los Angeles-based journalist, essayist, and educator. She writes about race, class and gender equity; grassroots arts and political movements; and California histories.

A frequent contributor to LA Weekly, she has also written news, features, and reviews for The Washington PostBitch: Feminist Response to Pop Culture, East Bay Express, KCET's Artbound, and Oakland Tribune. Her literary nonfiction has appeared in The Los Angeles TimesLos Angeles Review of Books, California Northern, American Literary Review, Travelers' Tales, and The Rumpus. More at www.jessicalanglois.com.

  Jenee PEERS Pix

Jeneé Darden has reported for National Public RadioTime magazineLos Angeles TimesEbonyMarketplaceHuffington Post, KQED, KPCC and the Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance magazine.  In 2005, she contributed reporting on the London 7/7 transit bombings for Time magazine’s Europe edition.

Jeneé has been interviewed/featured by BBCAccess HollywoodInside EditionNPRMarie ClaireDaily MailDaily BeastKTVUBlackGirlNerd.comBeyondBlackWhite.com, the book Swirling. She was mentioned in the hit FX miniseries The People v. O.J. Simpson. The daughter of former O.J. Simpson prosecutor Christopher Darden, Jeneé holds a BA in ethnic studies from UC San Diego and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Southern California. More at www.cocoafly.com.

  Jenny Chen

Jenny J. Chen is an award-winning science journalist and multimedia producer. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, NYTimes.com, NPR, Washington Post, Reader’s Digest, Vice, and many more.

In 2014 and 2015, she was awarded a PRX STEM grant to produce stories for NPR member stations across the country. In 2014, she received a grant from the D.C. Humanities Council to produce a radio documentary series on growing up mixed race in Washington, D.C. Jenny has also received numerous fellowships and awards to cover health, aging, minority issues, and climate change. She has spoken about journalism and the role of ethnic media at the Smithsonian Folklife festival. In another life, she has also had a play produced at Arena Stage and the Kennedy Center. More at www.jennychen.com.

Elizabeth Flock

Elizabeth Flock is a journalist based in Washington D.C., where she works as a reporter and producer at PBS NewsHour. She is currently working on a book, The Heart is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai, for Harper Collins (January 2018). Her reporting focuses on social issues, with a focus on the criminal justice system, protest movements and marriage and sexuality.

Elizabeth was a breaking news reporter at the Washington Post and staff writer at U.S. News and World Report. She has also written for the New York Times, the Village Voice, the AtlanticNew York Magazine, and the Chicago Tribune. More at www.lizflock.com.

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If you're attending AWP, feel free to get in touch. I'd love to meet up with you! And please come to our panel. It's on Friday, Feb. 10, from 3-4:15 pm