We're Featured on the Wild Ones St. Louis Blog!
The Care and Feeding of Your Skillet

Giveaway! Win a Signed Copy of Doug Tallamy's 'Bringing Nature Home'

Bringing Nature Home

Last night we attended a Partners for Native Landscaping event at the Missouri Botanical Garden: "Nature's Best Hope." The event featured native plant expert Doug Tallamy, with a presentation based on his latest book. If you haven't read Doug Tallamy, I highly recommend him. His first book, Bringing Nature Home, helped spawn a rapidly growing movement to focus on native plants in home gardens. With his latest book, he expands upon that to imagine what we could do if we stitched together the fragments of true nature we have left by converting other public and private swathes of land to native plant ecosystems. It's a compelling, inspiring argument.

To help promote these ideas, we're giving away a free, signed copy of Bringing Nature Home. All you have to do to be eligible to win is subscribe to our newsletter. If you're already subscribed, you're automatically in the pool, but please do tell your friends! The drawing happens on March 31, 2020, so sign up before that cutoff date.

Tallamy's lecture at the Botanical Garden was sold out, and today's full-day workshop on native plants is as well. At the reception before last night's talk, Anthony and I had a nice long chat with Marsha Gebhardt, president of the St. Louis chapter of Wild Ones. She mentioned that she and the other Wild Ones leaders (all volunteers) feel like "victims of their own success," as their events are so popular, they're investigating larger meeting venues and generally feeling the growing pains of a swelling membership base.

It's great to see the enthusiasm for native plant gardening, and we hope it continues.

I do want to share an observance I've made after spending a good deal of time self-studying both permaculture and native plant gardening: Permaculturists and native plant proponents need to work together. I see a lot of the same arguments being made by both, which is a key place to have a discussion. But then they're sometimes working at odds due to blind spots on both sides:

  1. Permaculturists can actually do damage to their own and connected ecosystems with their use of invasive species. For example, autumn olive might be a great choice for soil remediation and people food, but even if it's slashed and mulched later, birds could have spread its seeds to sensitive natural areas. It's also just not going to do much in terms of attracting and feeding pollinators and interrelated species.
  2. Native plant gardeners miss the importance of growing one's own food and other human use products, which can mitigate the damage of the agricultural food system. For example, if you're buying 100% of your groceries from a store that trucks most of its supply in from out of state and out of country, you're part of a system that depletes topsoil at alarming rates and poisons a dwindling watershed, no matter what good you're doing in your own yard with native plants.

We're managing our best at Dragon Flower Farm to bridge the two camps, taking the tried and tested practices from both and applying them to our 1/4-acre. I'm sure we'll make mistakes, and we don't claim to be purists by any stretch of the imagination, but we try not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

We wish you well in your own efforts at sustainability and lifestyle gardening, and as always, tell us what you think in the comments below. Good luck on the giveaway, too!

You Might Also Like:

We're Featured on the Wild Ones St. Louis Blog!

Garden Stars of the Year: How to Win with Native Plants

Much Ado About 'Nothing' - How to Convert Your Lawn in 5 Steps

 

comments powered by Disqus