Art Feed

Poppies and Whimsy on the St. Louis Native Plant Tour

NPT_glimpse
View of a woodland bubbler in the garden of Dan and Mary Terpstra, also featured in Doug Tallamy's book, Nature's Best Hope.

By Lisa Brunette

Anthony and I attended the St. Louis Native Plant Tour for the first time this year. It was a masked, socially-distanced, outdoor (of course) affair in early June, with a wide range of gardens to view. A joint offering by both the St. Louis Audubon Society and Wild Ones St. Louis, this year's tour included nine residential gardens located across the St. Louis metropolitan area, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi River. We made it to six of the nine.

NPT_celadine poppy
Celadine poppy growing in the garden of Dan and Mary Terpstra.

I've talked about the Audubon Society's Bring Conservation Home program on the blog before - most recently when we scored platinum status for our own garden. Many BCH gardens were included in the tour, with a nice smattering at every level, from silver through gold and up to platinum. One of our favorites on the tour was Dan and Mary Terpstra's woodland oasis. It's easy to see why this .62-acre property has achieved platinum status - and why it attracts so many birds - 150 species and counting.

NPT_platinum
View across the woodland toward the gazebo in Dan and Mary Terpstra's garden.

Here's a video of their pond, which features a bubbling cascade into a naturalized area for native water-loving plants.

 

While the Terpstras obviously take conservation seriously, they haven't neglected the whimsical aspects of gardening.

NPT_mushrooms
Garden art tucked into a rock in Dan and Mary Terpstra's garden.

Speaking of garden whimsy, while the Terpstra's property offers a stunning example of what can be done, my favorite of the tour was actually the garden of Christina Rutz and Mark Hrabovsky, which had whimsy in spades.

NPT_music stand
In the garden of Christina Rutz and Mark Hrabovsky.

This garden clocks in at the BCH gold level and comes with a wonderful personal story, to quote the tour brochure:

Established in 2010, Carolyn's Garden is a living memorial to Christina's mother, an avid gardener. Diagnosed in 1996 with stage 4 breast cancer and given six months to live, she proved doctors wrong, living with the disease until 2011... a testament to being a lifelong gardener.

Many of the plants in the Rutz/Hrabovsky garden were transitioned there from her mother's garden over in Illinois.

NPT_pathway
A pathway beckons in the Rutz/Hrabovsky garden.
NPT_glass ball
A glass ball emerges from penstemon in the Rutz/Hrabovsky garden.

Another highlight was getting to tour the garden belonging to Robert Weaver, editor of The Gateway Gardener, which features this lovely water bubbler.

Now, a note about these bubblers, though: You don't need them. While it's true that birds are attracted to the sound of bubbling water, the problem with bubblers is they need a power source in order to, well, bubble. And that means a) you have to be able to afford to install (or have installed) an electrical bubbler connected to your home's power system and b) you're adding to your home's draw on the electric grid, not the best option, eco-wise, unless it's also solar-powered. Our garden achieved platinum status without a bubbler; as mentioned previously, we have four bird baths, all fashioned out of repurposed items and not costing a dime.

Here's a perfectly nice non-bubbling bird bath, also in the Weaver garden.

NPT_birdbath
In the Weaver garden.
NPT_shade
Shade-loving Virginia sweetspire in the Weaver garden.

One of the best aspects of garden tours like this one is you get to see first-hand fine examples of plants that thrive in challenging areas, such as deep shade (above) or intense sunshine, like these native prickly pears.

NPT_prickly pear
In the garden of Susan and René LaVoise.

While honeybees are not native to North America, it was cool to spot these beehives in the garden of Jim and Judy Stroup, where we started our tour.

NPT_beehives
Beehives at the Stroup garden.

And last but certainly not least was the garden of Dave and Karen Tylka, avid conservationists whose gold-certified property features many a bee hotel in addition to bird bottles, bird and bat houses, and more than 30 woody native plant species and 95 wildflower species.

NPT_beehotels
A stunning array of bee hotels in the garden of Dave and Karen Tylka.
NPT_Indian pink
The common name of this native plant is 'Indian pink,' though it's neither pink nor from India!
NPT_Ninebark
Ninebark growing in the Tylka garden.
NPT_smooth sumac
This smooth sumac grows in part-shade in the Tylka garden.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Easy DIY Bird Baths for Your Stay-at-Home Pleasure

The Cat in the Flock Farm Goes Platinum!

Garden Stars of the Year: How to Win with Native Plants

 


A Smash Sale for the Dreamslippers Series 7th Anniversary

BOX SET 2

By Lisa Brunette

I can't believe it's been this long already, but the Dreamslippers Series turns seven this month. To mark the lucky 7 anniversary, I've enrolled the series in the Smashwords Summer Winter Sale. This means deep discounts (and one freebie) on the ebook versions of all three original novels, as well as the boxed set, which includes a bonus novella. The sale ends July 31.

For those of you who are new to the blog, the Dreamslippers is my sexy-but-cozy murder mystery series, which Anthony and I released between 2014 and 2016 under our own imprint, Sky Harbor Press. Since he and I both went into the venture with many years of publishing experience under our belts, you can think of it as professional self-publishing. All three books in the series won indieBRAG medallions, awarded to only the top tier of independently published books, and the second novel in the series, Framed and Burning, was also a finalist for the prestigious Nancy Pearl Book Award and nominated for a RONE Award. The books have been praised by Kirkus Reviews, Readers Lane, Book Fidelity, Wall-to-Wall Books, BestThrillers.com, Mystery Sequels, and many others. All three enjoy Amazon ratings of 4-5 stars.

About the Books

The Dreamslippers solve crimes using yoga and meditation, along with their special ability to 'slip' into your dreams. But that isn't easy. 

CITF

Cat McCormick comes of age both as a Dreamslipper and a private investigator in the series debut, Cat in the Flock. Following a mother and daughter on the run, she goes undercover in a fundamentalist church. FREE during the Smashwords Sale.

F&B

It was supposed to be a much-needed vacation in Miami, meant to snap Cat out of a persistent depression. But when her great uncle’s studio goes up in flames, killing his assistant, Cat must find out who’s really to blame. Half off in the sale.

BTTT

What happens when your client thinks she knows who the killer is, but you don’t believe her? Cat and Granny Grace aren't too sure Nina Howell fell under the spell of a domineering, conservative talk show host... until he starts to look guilty. The case brings powerful new developments in Cat’s dreamslipping skill as she works to find the truth. Half off in the sale.

Boxedset

Get all three books, plus a bonus novella prequel--Work of Light, Granny Grace's origin story--only available in the boxed set. Receive a discount of 25% now in the Smashwords sale.

Rather Have a Paper Copy?

You can always purchase the Dreamslippers Series in paperback from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other outlets. 

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE THESE POSTS FROM THE DREAMSLIPPERS SERIES LAUNCH BACK IN 2014:

Cat in the Flock Facts

Cat in the Flock - the Trailer

Cat in the Flock - in the News!


How to Shop Like a Pro at Estate Sales

Pexels-tima-miroshnichenko-6827330
Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels.

By Anthony Lee

Editor's note: We're thrilled to bring you guest blogger Anthony Lee, owner of Yard Sale Radar. Yard Sale Radar is a hobbyist-owned business that takes the hassle out of finding or advertising yard and estate sales. The website runs like an app and allows people to search for garage/yard/estate sales based on their locations or with a zip code. Save time and money by easily posting your listing and appear to anyone searching their listings for a yard sale in your area.

If you love the thrill of the hunt that comes with thrifting and yard sales but aren’t visiting any estate sales, you are missing out on an opportunity for amazing vintage finds. Estate sales are like yard sales, but instead of just browsing items they’ve set out on their driveway, you’re perusing through the entire property. They’re usually held for a number of unfortunate reasons. Sometimes the sellers have a need to downsize, or the owners may have passed away. Be that as it may, estate sales provide a unique opportunity for people to walk through a home and find really interesting, affordable goods. Lucky for you, we’ve got some great tips to make sure you go through your first estate sale like a seasoned pro. 

Planning Ahead

First things first, planning ahead is essential. This is especially important if you’re going to visit more than one estate sale in a day. There are some amazing resources for estate sale enthusiasts that make preparing your itinerary a breeze. Yard Sale Radar provides tons of information about America’s top estate and yard sale cities like Denver, Seattle, D.C., and more. Our site allows you to find estate sales in any given zip code. We suggest finding the sales you want to go to in your area of preference, plugging them into Google Maps, and planning your trip a day ahead. Try to get there 30-minutes earlier than the sale begins so you can get first dibs.

Remember, cash is king. Professionally managed estate sales are more likely to accept different payment methods such as credit and debit cards. However, most sales operate on a cash-only basis. Having cash on hand may also give you some negotiating leverage for snagging an item on the spot. So definitely plan a stop at the ATM on the way to your first sale. 

Estate sales are also not baby-proofed. These homes likely have stairs, sharp corners, hard floors, and fragile items throughout, so it’s probably best to leave your two- and four-legged little ones at home.

Pro-tip: In addition to the items within them, many of these properties are for sale (sometimes for epic prices). If you are interested in the property, too, see if they have a listing online. Usually, they’ll have photos of the home, and you can use this as a guide to where the items you desire may reside within the home.

Dress the Part

If you’re on the hunt for clothing items, make sure you wear something that makes it easy to try things on and bring your own bag. For instance, sandals so you can easily slip them on and off to try on shoes or shorts and tank tops so you can slip clothes right over for easy try-on’s. Make sure your shoes are comfortable if you plan on visiting several estate sales in one day. These properties are often large and require lots of walking or waiting outside. As for bags, the most common go-tos are Ikea’s hefty, blue totes. These are great to pile in items at estate sales. If planning on purchasing furniture or larger items, don’t forget to pack your measuring tape. 

Getting There

The driveway is usually reserved for sale workers, so make sure you park in the designated area. (If needed, you can pull up your car to load it later). If you see a line of people waiting outside, walk over to the front door to ask a worker how the estate sale is organized. You may have to put your name on a list or take a number and wait. If there’s no line at all, you are welcome to walk right in. 

Pexels-tima-miroshnichenko-6826047
Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels.

Time to Shop

Kindness goes a long way. Try to make friends with the workers or people running the sale. They can give you great tips and great deals. If you are searching for something specific, like jewelry, high-end bags, or vintage clothing, kindly ask one of them if there is a designated area for those items. Certain items are sometimes sorted into their own sections. Otherwise, go straight to where you think those items might be. 

Remember that estate sales are sometimes being held for unfortunate or tragic reasons. It’s important to remain respectful and compassionate during your visit. This was once someone’s home, and owners may be grieving or have emotional ties to items being sold, so keep that in mind when you’re walking through their homes and handling each item. 

Don’t skip the places you think might have the least desirable items. You can find unexpected gems in unlikely parts of the house like the basement and even utility rooms. Always remember to scan the patio and yard for planters, plants, and patio decor. Everything is fair game unless marked otherwise. 

Don’t rush. Before checking out, take your time doing one more pass through the entire house. You never know what you are going to miss, especially on tables cluttered with items. 

Estate sales are no-refund, as-is sales, so inspect your items carefully. If you’re purchasing electronics, don’t make the rookie mistake of forgetting to test them beforehand. 

Negotiate

The first day of the estate sale always has the most merchandise, but the last day always has the best deals. If you like multiple items, you can try to bargain for some amazing bundle discounts. Always be courteous, don’t haggle, and ask discreetly, “Is this the best price?” or “Do you negotiate?” If you’re rude to estate sale organizers, they can ban you from future sales so think twice before you bicker with them.

Have Fun

Whether you’re looking to upgrade your wardrobe with vintage designer pieces or make your eclectic home decor dreams come true, estate sales are one of the most underrated places for collecting unique and rare finds. You never know what you’re going to uncover. Happy hunting!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Easy DIY Rehab on a FREE Vintage Glider Set

Super-Easy DIY Rehab of This Sweet Mid-Century Modern Swirl Lamp

Our Best Antique Mall and Freebie Finds of the Year


It's Time to Honor the Pets Who've Kept Us COVID Company

Chaco_portrait

By Lisa Brunette

It's been a long, hard year with this COVID situation, and let's face it: We couldn't have done it without our pets. 

While our coworkers went from the living, breathing human beings we interacted with on a daily basis to talking heads on a Zoom screen, Rover and Boots became ever-present reminders of the value of physical touch. They rested their heads in our laps, distracted us with their antics, kept our feet warm, offered a reassuring purr and cuddle. Especially for people living alone, this source of daily joy and unconditional love has been nothing short of a lifesaver.

So it's time to honor them, and what better way than with a cool modern portrait?

Chaco's been with us for about five years now, and I'm surprised to admit that we had zero framed photos of him in our house. Of course we take plenty - my recent treatise on ol' kittypants is just a small, representative sampling - but I just hadn't gotten around to framing any. And maybe it's the utilitarian Midwesterner in me - what do you need a picture of your pet for when he's right here in front of you everyday? But as it turns out, a spankin' chi-chi portrait of Chaco was exactly the thing I didn't know I needed in my life until I had one.

Chaco_portrait2

I mean, have you seen anything better? This picture makes me laugh every time I look at it. We hung it in our dining room, where I'm amused by it several times a day.

I know you're green with envy, but I'm about to cure your jealousy: You can get one of these portraits of your pet, too!

In honor of our wonderful animal companions, Cat in the Flock is happy to offer our readers 15% off these stylish, custom pet portraits. Just use the code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout.

Here's a sample from the makers, West & Willow, this time with a dog as subject, and a white background. They have several background choices as well as different options for the frame.

White-bk

To get your portrait with the 15% discount, all you need to do is use this link to head over to West & Willow, and then use the promo code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout. A few notes:

  • Yes, you can get a portrait for any kind of pet, whether bird, iguana, guinea pig, etc.
  • If you have two or three pets and want a group portrait of them, no problem.
  • West & Willow will work with you to create a pet memorial, if that's what you need.
  • No, you can't get human-subject portraits, even if you keep a human as a pet, ha, ha, ha.
  • Make sure you have a good quality digital photo of your pet before you begin the process. The portrait is crafted with it. We used this one for Chaco.

Chaco

Here's the link again:

West & Willow Pet Portrait - 15% Off!

And don't forget to use the code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout.

I hope you enjoy your pet portrait as much as we enjoy ours.

Cat in the Flock might receive a commission if you purchase from West & Willow.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Meet Chaco, the 'Indoor Only' Suburban Farm Cat

A Peek at Our Peony, and Some Free Plants!

This Banner Is for the Birds!


The Winners of Our 'Wildlife-Friendly Vegetable Gardener' Book Giveaway

Lynne_Griffin
Winner Lynne Griffin, of Aurora, Colorado, USA.

We're pleased to announce the winners of our book giveaway. Two lucky subscribers each received a signed paperback copy of Tammi Hartung's book, The Wildlife-Friendly Vegetable Gardener. Winners Lynne Griffin and Lila McClellan are avid gardeners and nature lovers, and they also both live in Colorado, a landscape that can be a challenge as much as it is a joy for gardeners. We're excited to share their stories and images with you.

Lynne Griffin of Aurora, CO

Griffin Garden1
In Lynne Griffin's garden, a monarch on purple coneflower.
 
Our first winner talks about what it's like to garden in Colorado. As it's also where Tammi Hartung herself runs Desert Canyon Farm, Lynne is in good company. Lynne explains:
Since we have a fairly short growing season in Colorado, we normally start the seeds indoors in March and plant during the Memorial Day weekend, after the ground has warmed. We put in the usual vegetables; multiple varieties of tomatoes, multiple types of squash, cucumbers, cabbage, beets, etc. We also grow several herbs like basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley, sage, etc. 
 
Our flower gardens are literally for the birds and the bees. Our yard has lots of native species of flowers to help keep everyone happy. We have several seed feeders as well as multiple bird baths. Since we're birders, we just love watching all of them visit.
Living close enough to visit Desert Canyon Farm, Lynne was already a fan of Tammi Hartung but had never read this book. She's now a regular reader of Cat in the Flock, too, and we're really glad to have her. "Many thanks for mailing Tammi Hartung's wonderful gardening book," says Lynne. "I've started reading it and am greatly enjoying all of her advice and wisdom." 
 
More pictures of her garden.
 
Griffin Garden2
Lynne makes birds welcome with a bird bath and feeders, in addition to native plants.
Griffin Garden3
We love the solution to the backend slope, with a grouping of native trees and plants set off by a rock wall.

Lila McClellan of Coaldale, CO

Lila and book_1
 
Lila McClellan is an accomplished painter and photographer in addition to gardener; you can see her breathtaking work over at Wolf's Head Art. Before COVID-19, she took a whole season of classes offered at Desert Canyon Farm, drawn to Tammi Hartung's focus on living in harmony with nature. "I am looking forward to reading this latest book and using her techniques for helping the wildlife and pollinators," says Lila. "Thanks so much."
 
Lila already does quite a bit to make her garden wildlife-friendly, whether that's placing perching spots - in this case, crystals - in her bird baths to enable small insects to sip there in addition to the birds, or putting in bluebird houses. But she's excited to find new ideas in Tammi's book.
 
While Lynne's garden has more of a suburban feel, Lila's is a bit more rugged. Her struggles with the harsh Colorado environment are sometimes profound:
Living at the foothills of 12,000-foot mountains has its challenges. I mostly plant natives that are adapted to this climate of harsh winds, extreme temperatures, and the multitude of animal life and insect populations. I know gardening starts with the soil, so, I've been paying closer attention to this and began making my own compost with worms and an insulated compost bin. We also have 11 ducks that help by adding lots of fertilizer and eating the bugs (especially those voracious grasshoppers). We also mulch the outdoor beds with their 'used' straw when we clean out the duck pen in the spring and fall.
 
Ducks and wall
The bird bath gets some visitors in Lila McClellan's garden, at the foot of the mountains.
 
Lila's biggest foe isn't the lack of water or the shorter growing season, though. It's the weather itself:
The number one problem I have is the WIND! It can be discouraging to amend the soil and watch it blow away on windy days. I also wonder how the plants survive when they go sideways instead of up. My husband built a seven-foot wall on the south side of our yard to block some of the wind, which helps a lot. This summer, I will be putting up paver stones to make two-foot walls on some of the beds. I installed a soaker hose watering system a few years ago, which is a tremendous help since it saves water and time. Some wells near my house can go dry when there is a severe drought situation, but we haven't had that problem.
 
Spirea_001
Spirea, growing in Lila's garden.
We decided to use the wind to our advantage; this summer, my husband will be installing a wind turbine to power the electric in our geodome greenhouse that we finished last fall. To keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter, we have a swamp cooler and a heater, which will greatly extend our growing season for herbs and produce. Living in/with nature is an ongoing process as the seasons change. I enjoy the challenges and rewards and am thankful and in awe of the plants that survive. 
Geo-dome
Lila's domed greenhouse, soon to be powered by the wind.
 
Beets and chickweed_1
Beets and chickweed.
 
Congratulations to Lynne and Lila on their wins, and we hope they both enjoy Tammi's book as much as we did.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE