Yoga/Movement Feed

The Real Reason You Can't Headstand

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This lopsided version of Shirshasana is about as good as it gets, folks.

By Lisa Brunette

Over the 25 years that I've practiced yoga, I've struggled with a great many things. I've struggled to harness my breath, and I've struggled to bring my mind back to the room when my thoughts have wandered. I've struggled mightily with my own ego. These are good challenges, the real work of every yoga practice. I have eventually felt a kind of victory or maybe the word is mastery over these challenges--if not permanently, then for gratifying moments. 

But there's one aspect of yoga that never ceased to be a struggle for me--until I wised up and decided to cease with the struggle altogether. That's inversions. 

I've never felt great about headstand and have almost always experienced pain in my neck after performing the pose. I struggled with this for many years. My critical mind kept after me: 'Why can't I do this? I should be able to do this.' After years of trying, the best I could do was a sort of lopsided headstand against the wall, as pictured above. Maybe you've had a similar experience.

For a long time, I thought maybe my inability to get to the impressive level of headstand done with seeming ease by my peers was psychological, as that was suggested to me by more than one teacher, like I had some kind of "block" or "fear" about it. This is quite an accusation, and I now know that no yoga teacher should ever suggest that to a student. It's likely just wrong, and even if it's right, who are you to make that diagnosis of someone else's yoga practice? Seriously, are you a yoga teacher or a therapist? 

It creates a kind of chicken-and-egg problem, too. A student feels reluctance about headstand, probably for good reasons, and is told she has a "block" or "fear" about the pose, which could actually create a block or fear that wasn't really there before!

Later I realized how wrong that assessment had been, and how it might have only served to give me yet another point of self-criticism that I didn't need. An odd thing happened when my husband and I took acroyoga classes together. I found out I had no trouble with inversions when supported on the floor by my base. As a flyer, I took to the upside-down poses with ease, even delight. Nope, not a single feeling of being "blocked" or "afraid" of inversions.

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I love this pose!

Still, the critical mind likes to criticize, so I thought maybe my block or fear went away in acroyoga because I had the "support" of a base--in the photo above, my husband. Yeah, I found a way to beat myself up about it, like I can't do headstands "on my own," like I'm a weak person who needs "help."

Raise your hand if you talk to yourself like this, too. OK, now let's pledge not to do this anymore.

It wasn't until my teacher training this year that I figured out why I had always struggled with headstands on a mat. As it turns out, the real reason isn't psychological; it's anatomical! My humerus (upper arm) bones are relatively short compared to the span between my upper torso and the top of my head. What this means is that I simply cannot get my forearms under my head enough in a headstand to use them as support. You can see this in the first photo above: My upper arms don't extend far enough to give me clearance. The result is that a) my scapula have to come away in a destabilized position in order for me to get my arms flat to the floor and b) even with this unstable attempt to reach my forearms above my head, my neck still bears my full body weight.

Now some yogis can handle headstand even with short upper arm bones because they have muscle strength in their necks that allows them to take on their full body weight. But I'm not one of those people. Due to scoliosis and multiple car accidents, I really should not ask my cervical spine to bear my full body's weight.

It's liberating for me to gain this anatomical understanding of a limitation my body has known of intuitively for years. All credit to Paul Grilley and his amazing yoga anatomy DVD for this wisdom.

I'm not the only one rebelling from the headstand/handstand pressure we yogis feel. 

I can't handstand

Here's Instagram's @hippiehealthfreak reacting against the expectation in the yoga world that teachers and students alike should be able to pop into these poses regardless of anatomical limitations. Forcing ourselves into these poses can do real damage. Here, it's wrist injury from handstand, which could come from anatomical differences in the rotation at the elbow, wrist, and shoulder joints as well as the compression angle of the elbow.

Note this doesn't mean inversions are off-limits to me--or anyone else with similar anatomical limitations--forever. Remember, I have no problem with them in acroyoga. When my shoulders are supported, as on my base's knees in the acro photo above, and my neck is simply hanging free, I feel great. 

Perhaps this is a good time to talk about another weird misperception in the world of yoga, and that's the one that causes an aversion to props. A lot of yogis won't use them, often because they've gone to a class where the teacher pooh-pooh'd them as a "crutch" or "training wheels," I guess. But that's not a logical way to look at props. They can literally make up the difference in an anatomical limitation, enabling you to do a pose that is otherwise off limits. In the acroyoga photo above, aren't my husband's legs, in effect, a prop?

What happens if we substitute a physical structure for the human prop in this instance? Well, you get something like the below. I haven't tried any of these products yet, but I'd love to hear your thoughts and recommendations. Would you use any of these? Have you? Which would you suggest I try?

Note: This post is not sponsored, and we don't receive anything in exchange for mentioning the below props.

1. Desire Life Yoga Headstand Bench

2. Sisyama Fitness Yoga Chair and Inversion Bench

3. The Original FeetUp Trainer

 

Tell me your thoughts in the comments below!

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Get 50-100% Off The Dreamslippers Series for Ebook Week

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by Lisa Brunette

Kicking off today and running through March 13 is Ebook Week at online publisher Smashwords, an awesome alternative to Amazon. We're offering deep discounts on The Dreamslippers Series ebooks - prices not seen since the series first launched in 2014! That includes all three novels in the series, as well as the boxed set collection of books plus the bonus novella.

For the uninitiated, The Dreamslippers is a 'yogi detective' series with a slight psychic bent. The Dreamslippers are a family with the ability to 'slip' into other's dreams - but that isn't easy. Grandmother/granddaughter duo Grace and Cat practice yoga and meditation to hone and focus their ability, using it to solve crimes.  

Here's the full series with discounts noted, as well as links to each book's Smashwords page. You don't need a coupon code - just purchase the book, and the discount will be applied.

Book 1 - Cat in the Flock - 100% Off - FREE!

CITF

The first book in the series is a cozy, sexy coming-of-age story about young dreamslipper Cat McCormick, who's learning to control her ability for the first time, by apprenticing with her successful PI grandmother. But when Cat goes undercover in an evangelical church, will she avoid temptations in her quest for the truth? 

  • #1 Amazon bestseller in both the paranormal and private investigators ebook categories
  • Winner of an indieBRAG medallion
  • Praised by Kirkus Reviews, Midwest Book Reviews, and dozens of other independent blogs and reviewers
  • Amazon Rating: 4.3/5 on 78 reviews

Book 2 - Framed and Burning - 50% Off

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Set in spicy Miami, Framed and Burning is probably my personal favorite in the series. It follows Grace and Cat as they unravel the mystery of a strange and fiery death. Cat's uncle has channeled his dreamslipping ability into a career as a successful painter - but just how far is he willing to go for his art?

  • Winner of an indieBRAG
  • Nominated for a Nancy Pearl Book Award and a RONE Award
  • Praised by Mystery Sequels, On My Kindle, BestThrillers, and many others
  • Amazon Rating: 4.4/5 on 47 reviews

Book 3 - Bound to the Truth - 50% Off

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Writing this one took me on some interesting research trips.... Back in Seattle and fully ensconced in Grace's detective agency, Cat must solve the bizarre murder of a famed local architect - who was murdered in one of the hotels she designed. Is this a case of professional rivalry gone horribly wrong, or does this murder's sexual fetish overtones point to something darker?

  • Winner of an indieBRAG
  • Winner of a Curtie Curt Award
  • Praised by Book Fidelity, J Bronder Reviews, The Book Adventures of Emily, and others
  • Amazon Rating: 4.9/5 on 10 reviews

The Boxed Set - 75% Off

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The best deal of the week, the boxed set contains all three books above, plus a bonus novella set in the 1960s. "Work of Light" is a prequel that tells Grace's origin story. It was a lot of fun to imagine "Granny" Grace in her twenties, living on an ashram and dealing with the vicissitudes of a guru and his flock.

It's my pleasure to offer these discounts - and tell your friends, too! The sale ends March 13.

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Cat in the Flock's Most Popular Posts of All Time

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Repurposed frying pan bird bath.

 By Lisa Brunette

Cat in the Flock turns seven this year, so it's a good time to take a look at where we've been and what's resonated with you readers. What a wild ride we've had together! I launched this website in September 2014 as an author blog to support the release of my first novel, Cat in the Flock. That self-published mystery novel was enough of a success to warrant a whole series - the Dreamslippers - and the blog focused on it for the first few years. But then around 2017 I took my experience as a game storyteller and fused it with the work of mystery novelist to create two interactive novels in the mystery genre, and my game writing splashed onto this blog as a result. With the success of the game projects, I had the opportunity to launch my own game-writing company in short order, and in 2018, I split off Brunette Games as its own site. That left Cat in the Flock, which I pivoted toward the lifestyle content I'm passionate about, giving me a counterpoint outlet for the non-fiction stories I think about every day.

And Cat in the Flock is growing. As I mentioned when I listed our top five posts for 2020, last year we had seven writers produce a total of 52 posts. While monetization continues to prove tricky and elusive, we've enjoyed the opportunity to share the story of our quarter-acre suburban homestead and our quest to become more self-sufficient and ecologically sustainable, along with a broadening offering of others' stories of trial and triumph. 

So which missives stand out the most over the past seven years? I've kept track of analytics for the whole span, and I can tell you which of our posts had the highest number of page views, a good indicator of how popular they are with readers. Here they are, starting with No. 5.

No. 5 - The Birds Win Big

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Bird bath made from tempered glass pot lid and breeze block.

Our most-viewed post of 2020 is also the fifth most popular post of all time: Easy DIY Bird Baths for Your Stay-at-Home Pleasure. Especially in a year of extreme homeboundedness, the thought of quickly crafting attractive bird baths from castoffs you might have in your basement just struck a chord. We're happy to see the enthusiasm, as it's a huge win for the birds if more people put out and maintain bird baths.

No. 4 - A Born Entrepreneur?

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The interactive novel I designed and wrote for Daily Magic Productions.

Next up is a longform piece I wrote to explain the one-eighty I took in 2018 from professor to full-time small business owner. While it's really more of an origin story, if you will, for Brunette Games, I've kept it here on the CITF blog for posterity. It's an interesting read, if you're curious about the vicissitudes of publishing, the game industry, and business startups. While I've always thought of myself more as a creative-for-hire than an entrepreneur, and I don't even take the CEO title at the helm of BG, it's good to think about what makes me the type of person who consistently chooses to leave academia for the private sector, where, to quote one of my favorite classic movies, "They expect results."

No. 3 - Slip into My Dream

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Cover art for my first novel.

Considering that the whole reason for this blog's existence is the Dreamslippers mystery series, I guess I would've been disappointed if none of it had made it to the top five. But here at a solid No. 3 is the landing page for the series, a jumping-off point for each of the three novels, plus the boxed set with bonus novella. This year also marks the seventh anniversary of the release of the first novel in the series.

No. 2 - No Yoga Comparathons!

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My stepson, Zander, who's double-jointed, and me, who's not.

The top two posts of all time both share yoga as a theme, and they both bust some faulty assumptions about the ancient practice. In second place is Why You Shouldn't Compare Yourself to Yogi Superstars. In it I illustrate how body structures built into us from birth can largely determine what our yoga capabilities are, and no amount of yoga can ever change them. For example, in the side-by-side above, my stepson, Zander, who's double-jointed, can pop into reverse prayer pose despite nary a lick of yoga experience; whereas, I still find the pose challenging after 25 years of practice.

Yoga's dirty secret is that it can devolve into a high-pressured environment of endless yardstick-measuring, so I'm glad to see this piece, which published in March 2019, has legs.

No. 1 - The Real Reason You Can't Headstand

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Anthony and I demonstrating why props - even human ones! - make all the difference.

This might be the best article I've ever written for Cat in the Flock, and readers seem to agree. Like the above post on anatomical limitations to yoga poses, this one tackles some pretty damaging myths about inversions like handstand and headstand. I don't pull any punches about the irresponsible methods of some yoga teachers in shaming or guilting students into pushing themselves to get into poses that might be completely counter to their body's own structure and alignment. And hopefully, I've set quite a few yogis free with this declaration.

Do these results surprise you? What would you like to see us delve into on the blog in the future? Weigh in below!

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When It's Time to Take a Break from Yoga - and Go Outside

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View outside through the window of my spare room/home yoga studio.

By Lisa Brunette

In March of this year, the hot yoga studio I attended closed its doors due to the COVID-19 pandemic, forcing my practice homeward. This was the case with yoga studios across the United States, of course. Our spare bedroom was already set up for my daily physical therapy, so I tweaked it for yoga. Since I'd been practicing the style formerly known as "Bikram," which is the same 26 poses done every session, it was relatively easy to make the shift to home, as I had the sequence memorized. I even purchased a space heater to take the chill off the room, though it doesn't even come close to the 104°F temp of your average hot yoga studio.

Like many studios, I'm sure, mine quickly began offering livestream yoga classes... but I declined to take them. They offered them via Facebook, and as I'd left that platform entirely in September of last year, I didn't want to log back on just for yoga classes. I also felt as if enough of my life happened via video screens, since as a game writer with a home-based business and clients all over the world, I spend a good portion of my days talking with clients through video monitors. Some of these people I've never even met in real life, yet we've worked together for years.

I didn't want yoga to be one more in a growing list of things that happens through a screen.

So I made the home practice work, and it did for awhile. But when the weather turned nice, and I launched into spring vegetable gardening in a bigger way than I ever had before, I found my yoga practice waning... and then it ceased altogether.

Damselfly
The ebony jewelwing, a species of damselfly native to the U.S. My brother Jason snapped this photo on one of our hikes this summer.

Did that spell doom for my health and well-being? Not at all. I walked, hiked, rode a bike, and gardened. In place of meditation on a mat, I enjoyed a walking meditation. Instead of sweating it out in eagle pose, I was outside with the red-shouldered hawks who nest in the trees across the street and frequently touch down in our backyard. I soaked up vitamin D from all that sunshine, I breathed in air that hadn't recirculated through an HVAC system, and I saw the natural world change from spring to late spring to early summer and now to summer's end, with successions of blooms and leaves and different kinds of plants, animals, and insects living out the cycles of their lives.

Rabbit

I had a kind of "dances with rabbits" moment this spring, when two parenting eastern cottontails - one I recognized as a previous visitor because of its distinctively mangled ear - frequented my backyard with their three rambunctious offspring. Actually, I think they literally built their warren in the middle of a brush pile we'd left in a corner of the yard. Perhaps between the hospitable environment we'd created for them and my habit of spending long hours quietly working in the garden, the whole family became comfortable with me. They stayed in the yard with me for some time, the parents regarding me with apparent curiosity - and wariness, at least at first - and the youngsters frolicking around, seemingly oblivious. They were fun to watch as they made up what looked like fun games. One would surprise the other, getting a "shoot up straight into the air" reaction, and then the tables would turn as the other bunny did the surprising next time.

After several hours of occupying the yard together, the rabbits did something strange: They slowly moved closer to me. All five of them were eventually within six feet of me at once, all of us just squatting there in the garden, enjoying... life. They weren't eating or playing or running around then, just sitting, quiet and still, regarding me with their deep eyes. A spell seemed to descend on the six of us, as I sat quiet and still as well, stopping my work, regarding them in return. It was as if we shared one presence together. I'll never forget it.

Sure, you can take a cynical tact about rabbits eating your garden food, and they did gobble up a fair amount of seedlings in early spring. Maybe they felt grateful to me for the yummy treats. But as soon as their preferred food, white clover, popped up, they left my plants alone. I quite like having them around, and that moment in the garden was kind of, well, magical.

Another day, I came upon a deer as I hiked through the woods. We watched each other for some time, even while other hikers passed through, not even noticing the deer, before the deer moved further into the woods, away from the path.

I nearly bumped into a raccoon one morning in my own backyard, both of us surprised to see each other.

These two ailanthus moths took my breath away when I discovered them like this on the underside of pineapple mint leaves.

Moths

This summer I helped a snapping turtle cross an asphalt strip in a local park, moving it out of the path of cyclists and joggers. Normally I leave wildlife alone, but this turtle move is recommended by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Snapping turtle

I've come across opossums and chipmunks, many a butterfly and bee, and once, a rather frightening-looking insect called a 'hanging thief' robber fly. In the evening, you can watch dragonflies and bats, circling overhead. They elude my camera, but hummingbirds have found a habitat here at Dragon Flower Farm, too.

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The eastern chipmunk, a new resident this year at Dragon Flower Farm.

While all this nature bathing is good for the body and soul, yoga is still amazingly good for you. It's helped me heal from trauma and car accidents, maintain a healthy weight, and counteract the effects of scoliosis. I've also used yoga to de-stress and feel more centered. Its power has been established over thousands of years, and it is not to be dismissed. 

I do crave the benefits of yoga, but now I consider what I've missed in a lifetime of exercise done primarily indoors. Not that I haven't practiced yoga outside - I've taken a few classes in parks in my day. But the vast majority of yoga classes - at least in the U.S. - occur inside. Sure, you can supplement with running outside, as I did for many years, or walking or swimming. But yoga is a studio activity, and that means thousands and thousands of hours logged inside over my 26-year practice, in addition to the time I already spent working, sleeping, and relaxing indoors.

Stick teepee
In a park nearby.

This year, I'm grateful for a deeper connection to the outdoors - on my own 1/4-acre, in a nature strip at a nearby park, and when I have the time, on the hiking trails here in the Missouri woods, grasslands, and wetland preserves. As I welcome yoga back into my life this fall, I don't want to miss any of nature's magical moments, even as I'm reaping the many benefits of a lifetime of practice. 

Sunset

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How to Foster a Healthy Immune System

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Image by michel kwan from Pixabay

Editors' note: Today on the blog, we've asked Amanda Jokerst, a certified herbalist and licensed massage therapist, to share her advice on how to stay healthy during this challenging time. We've both consulted with Amanda on our health and have been impressed with her care, experience, and especially her practical, evidence-based approach to herbal medicine and massage. Here in part 1, Amanda explains just why getting enough sleep, eating well, and other factors are so important. In part 2, she talks about specific herbs that can help, once the below steps are taken. Here's Amanda:

Many people ask me about proper immune system support and host resistance due to the COVID-19 pandemic, so I've written up a little guide to address some of these questions. The best preventative measures you can take aren't very glamorous or exciting, but rather the boring ol' basics we've heard so many times that we often just gloss over. But it might be helpful to know just why these things are important.

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Image by Pexels from Pixabay

Sleep

Getting enough sleep every night may be one of the most important things you can do for yourself, your body, and your community right now. Adequate sleep promotes a well-balanced nervous system and a healthy immune system. Give your body the time it needs every single day to rest, restore, and rejuvenate itself. Aim for 8-9+ hours of sleep per night. Most folks require this amount for optimal health, and some of us will require more than this for a short period if we have been sleep-deprived. People who get below this amount are very likely sleep-deprived, which affects metabolism, cortisol levels, and immune function. 

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Image by photosforyou from Pixabay

Stress

The state of our nervous system has a huge impact on the strength of our immune system. When stress hormones are high, immune function becomes depressed. I know it is so hard right now for many of us to feel calm. We don't know what is happening or what the future holds, and the world is rapidly changing on a daily basis. It is time to employ all of your favorite de-stressing activities and do whatever works for you to cultivate calm. This is the hardest thing for me right now. I've been finding my emotions bouncing all over the place as I take in the reality of what's happening. Spending time outside has been tremendously restorative for me. 

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Image by Evita Ochel from Pixabay

Diet

As much as is possible, try to eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of colorful fruits and veggies, as well as high-quality fats and proteins. Avoid foods that you know you are sensitive to or may trigger systemic inflammatory responses. This is also a great time to emphasize fermented foods as well to help strengthen the digestive system. When our digestion is strong, we are better able to utilize the nutrients from our food, which in turn supports the health of our whole body.

Important Immune Nutrients

Healthy immune function relies on adequate zinc, vitamins A, C, E and D, and selenium, as well as B vitamins, iron, calories, and protein. Without these nutrients, your immune system will not be able to work properly. You may experience more inflammation and find it takes longer to recover if you do get sick. If you are eating a well-balanced diet, all you should need is a high-quality multivitamin and an additional vitamin D supplement. In my clinic, I use O.N.E. Multivitamin by Pure Encapsulations and Vitamin D/K2 by Thorne. We carry both of these in the shop, and these are the basic supplements I've been recommending for folks coming in asking about which supplements they should be taking. Low vitamin D levels tend to occur during the winter months and may play a large role in immune dysfunction and susceptibility to respiratory infections. I usually suggest 4-6,000 IU per day. If you know you are vitamin D-deficient based on recent lab work, you may require higher doses. If your diet isn't as healthy as you'd like it to be or you've already had some respiratory infections this year, you may require extra supplementation to get your body nutritionally replete.

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Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Skip the Sugar & Alcohol

Studies have shown that just 100 grams of sugar lowers white blood cell counts for up to 5 hours and causes them to be about 40% less effective at killing pathogens. High sugar intake also inhibits vitamin C from entering our cells, an important immune system-supporting nutrient. Additionally, many foods that contain sugar aren't very nutrient dense, and we fill up without giving our body the vitamins and minerals it needs to function optimally. Try giving up or reducing sugar intake for (at least) a few weeks - your immune system will be so grateful.

Alcohol also depresses the immune system and inhibits the absorption of vital nutrients such as B1, B12, folate, and zinc – avoid it if you can. 

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Image by Richard Batka from Pixabay

Hydrate

Stay hydrated, folks! Divide your weight in half and drink at least that many ounces of water each day. Other options for fluids include herbal teas, broths, low-sugar fruit juices, and vegetable juices. Adequate hydration has tons of benefits, one of which is healthy mucous membranes that have healthy amounts of mucus. Mucus is over 90% water and is a very important part of our immune response that helps prevent pathogens from getting in and taking hold in our bodies. Our respiratory system is lined with mucous membranes, and we need them to be nice and moist to function well and resist infection, so drink up!

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Image by lfmatac from Pixabay

Exercise & Movement

Spend time moving your body in whatever ways you enjoy. Exercise and regular movement helps to pump our lymphatic systems, the part of our body responsible for clearing out regular metabolic wastes, and plays a major role in the clean-up efforts for our immune system. Not sure what kind of exercise to do? Just aim for at least 20-30 minutes of brisk walking each day – it's a very simple way to increase your lymphatic flow. 

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Image by Kylene Lynn from Pixabay

Get Outside

Even though we are trying to stay home as much as possible, we also need to get outside to feel the sun on our face, the air on our skin, and the ground beneath our feet. Take a walk, amble through the forest, sit by a stream, plant some seeds – reconnect to the land around you. We are being given an opportunity to slow down and be present for ourselves and the world, an opportunity to remember that the earth heals. A lot of us are scared, anxious, and lonely right now, and I know for myself that being outdoors provides a tremendous amount of comfort. I look at all of the plant life around me starting to bloom, I see the wind blowing through the trees, I hear the birdsong in my neighborhood, and I am reminded that I am never alone.

Amanda_jokerst

About Amanda Jokerst

Amanda is a certified clinical herbalist trained in the Vitalist tradition of herbal medicine, a licensed massage therapist, and a certified practitioner in the Arvigo techniques of Maya abdominal therapy. She is a graduate of the Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism, a 1255-hour program in Vitalist Western Herbalism, botany, herbal medicine-making and formulation, flower essences, nutrition, anatomy and physiology, pathology, and herbal safety. Amanda grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, and recently moved back after several years of study in various part of the country to open Forest & Meadow Clinic & Apothecary. She truly believes in the power of the therapies she practices, and says that offering this work to others is one of the most life-giving and soul-enriching things she's ever done. 

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The Fifth Anniversary of the 'Dreamslippers,' a Yogi Detective Series

BOX SET 2

By Lisa Brunette

Back in 2013, I decided to try my hand at writing a mystery novel. I had interviewed Seattle's mystery literati for a cover story in Seattle Woman magazine, and I'd also steered the storylines on hundreds of mystery-themed computer games for my employer at the time, Big Fish Games.

Another of my chief inspirations, perhaps oddly enough, was the 20 years' experience I had as a yogi. I'd practiced anywhere from three to seven days a week, first the grueling style known then as Bikram (hot) yoga and then the very energetic Baptiste-inspired style called Shakti (like dancing on your mat).

I also lost Grace, my would-be mother-in-law, to pancreatic cancer in 2011. She'd made a great impression on me in the short time I knew her and was a huge inspiration for the character Grace in the series. She was also a very practiced yogi herself.

After that, I knew I wanted to do two things with the book: 1) create an older female character and 2) make her a magical sort of yogi. 

I was also a huge fan of the TV show "Medium," about a psychic who helps an Arizona police team solve crimes. Allison DuBois, played by the fabulous Patricia Arquette, often struggles with the limitations built into her gift, sometimes making mistakes. Her fallibility, not to mention her authentically portrayed marital relationship, made the show rise above the fray (for seven seasons!). And there's one more thing. I'm someone whose childhood trauma led to PTSD nightmares, which plagued me for many years. So the often disturbing subject matter in DuBois' dreams resonated with me personally. I was used to looking for the truth in my dreams, sorting out the terror from the lessons.

All of that background and interest is reflected in the Dreamslippers Series, a three-book saga (plus novella) about a family of psychic dreamers who solve crime using their ability to 'slip' into your dreams. Solving crime that way is a lot tougher than you can imagine, as it's not like the culprit will dream of his guilt, pointing the erstwhile dreamslipper toward all of the clues. The matriarch of the family, Amazing Grace, supplements her sleeping skills with waking-life pursuits such as meditation, visualization, yoga, and even a somatic dance style called Nia, which I practiced myself for a few years. Young Cat McCormick, the hero of the inaugural book in the series, has an entirely different take. She bends and breaks the rules, and she capitalizes on an emotional connection to solve a mystery involving a Midwestern, fundamentalist preacher and his (not-gay-at-all) right-hand man.

BRAG medallion ebook CAT IN THE FLOCK

I released Cat in the Flock under my own imprint, Sky Harbor Press, in July 2014. It zipped up the Amazon sales charts, occupying the No. 1 spot in the Private Investigators category within the first year. It was praised by Kirkus Reviews, Midwest Book Review, Readers Lane, Book Fidelity, and countless other review sites, blogs, and institutions. I was contacted by a Hollywood producer about rights, and later, by more than one game studio interested in making an interactive novel out of it. Cat in the Flock won me my first IndieBRAG medallion, awarded to only the top 20 percent of independently published books. I would also be awarded the IndieBRAG for the other two books in the series.

Bolstered by the success of the first book, and full of more Dreamslippers stories to tell, I followed up with Framed and Burning. This second book in the series is set in Miami amidst the high-stakes art world, and its prescience can be seen in the Jeffrey Epstein case today. Cat and Grace follow the clues to a murder frame-up, which takes them into the Darknet and the powerful players behind a child pornography ring. While the characters and scenario are fiction, it's based on a great deal of factual research. I also lived in that colorful Florida city for two years while working toward an MFA in creative writing, which I earned from University of Miami. And I was once married to an artist, so my experience of that world is very much first-hand.

FRAMED AND BURNING IndieBRAG 2

Framed and Burning was a finalist for the prestigious Nancy Pearl Book Award, and it was also nominated for a RONE Award, in addition to winning the IndieBRAG.

The third book in the series, Bound to the Truth, is in a lot of ways my best. It continues the series' sex-crime theme, but back in Seattle, with an informed, fair portrayal of the Emerald City's sex-positive community. Cat and her grandmother visit a sex toy shop and a sex dungeon in their quest to track down the killer of a prominent Seattle architect. It was my answer to the huge disappointment that is Fifty Shades of Gray, not to mention an homage to Seattle's openness to all, quirkiness of the best kinds, and kinkiness in spades. As a divorced woman in her late 30s living in Seattle in the 2010s, I don't think I could have had a safer, more colorful, more ripe-for-literary fodder dating experience in any other city.

The Bound to the Truth cover is my favorite of the series, too. All three covers were created by Toronto designer Monika Younger, who's designed book covers for several of Harlequin's mystery imprints and brought a great deal of experience and vision to the series.

BOUND TO THE TRUTH 1400x2240 indieBRAG

After that, I went back and tackled Amazing Grace's origin story in a novella, Work of Light. It's only found in the ebook boxed set. Set in the past, when Grace first discovered her powers, it follows her to an ashram in the 60s, where she uncovers the guru's true nature.

I'm grateful to the many BETA readers who gave me feedback on drafts of the books. We writers are far too close to the work to judge it subjectively, especially the further into the drafting (or development) process we get. My BETA readers put on their "cruel shoes" and gave it to me straight, and I revised to the best of my abilities. I think it shows in the higher-than-average quality for not just an indie but for publishing as a whole.

Another dose of gratitude goes out to all of you readers who told your friends about the books, posted reviews hither and yon, and otherwise showed support for my indie publishing endeavor. When I look back on those heady three years with the Dreamslippers, I see that it truly takes a village to raise a book!

Finally, it's time for an important announcement:

In honor of the fifth anniversary of the series, the ebook boxed set of all three books plus the bonus novella is entirely FREE wherever ebooks are sold, except Amazon, where it's only 99 cents (that is the minimum price we are allowed to offer through Amazon). So please tell your friends. And thank you for your interest in my work. I'm so thrilled you find something of value in these words.

Handy book links here.

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