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Women in Games, Story in Games: Two Videos

PixelPop
Image source: @Wallstormer

Those of you who saw the buildup (part 1, part 2) and recap posts know all about PixelPop 2018, the highlight of the summer for many a game developer. I spoke on a panel discussion on women in games - one of the best treatments on this topic of the many I've taken part in. I also delivered a presentation on game storytelling, the official debut of the acronym "CMC," for the three main elements of game storytelling, as I see it: 

  1. Conflict
  2. Mystery
  3. Connection

If you wanted to come to my PixelPop talks and couldn't, never fear. You can watch both on video right here! Catch me now before I trademark CMC, and it all goes into the vault. (Kidding... I think.)

Conference Presentation

Panel Discussion

Hungry for more? Watch other videos here.

Correction: At the beginning of my presentation, I mentioned Cesar Chavez but meant to say Hugo Chavez. I seem to have a habit of flubbing a bit in the beginning of a presentation... until I get my footing, and then it's relatively smooth sailing after that. While I've done a lot of public speaking, especially for an introvert, I still get wildly nervous at the beginning of every talk.

 


Blog Hiatus, Photos from the Yarden

Backyard
Future site of the Dragonflower Mini-Farm.

There's a lot going on here as I approach month three with my (more than) full-time game design business. So... this blog is on hiatus until September-something. But when we return, I hope to bring you fresh voices and exciting offerings based on the feedback you gave on the survey.

For now, here are photos of the "yarden," someday to become the "Dragonflower Mini-Farm." It's a 1/4-acre plot close to the St. Louis city limits. Right now it's a gargantuan amount of turf for us my husband to mow (seriously, he wants to be the mower in the fam), but in the future we hope to transform it into an organic garden of vegetables, fruit, nuts, herbs, and native perennials. It's a long game that involves removal of a crazy ugly zigzagging chain link fence, planting screen trees to block the double-decker-balcony apartment building that looks down on us, and eradication of invasive honeysuckle and some awful tree called "stinking sumac." The two evil villains have formed an alliance and keep trying to take over.

I'll spare you most of THOSE sights for now, but here's some of the good stuff, especially yellow bearded iris, which seems rare to me but popped up all over the place this spring!

Iris
I know... it's overgrown. But look at the iris!
Rose
A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose...
Yarden
It's going to be a lot of work. I meant that to sound more excited.
It's going to be a lot of work!
Wildstrawberry
Wild strawberry.
Windowcat
At dawn, from the upstairs window, cat-view.
Yardensnow
This past winter.

One last thing: I found some great resources to help with this project. Super psyched to see efforts in Missouri to promote and protect pollinator habitats. We're definitely going to make our yarden as pollinator-friendly as possible. Check these out:

Grow Native!

St. Louis Audubon Society's Bring Conversation Home Program

Ciao for now. 

 


Photos from PixelPop 2018 and the Big SLU Flashback Event

As mentioned previously, I gave a presentation this weekend at PixelPop Festival. (If you missed it and wish you hadn't, never fear. I'll be reprising the talk for the St. Louis Game Developers Co-Op in a couple of weeks. There's also coverage on the blog in the form of a two-part series: 1) Why Does Story Matter in Games? and 2) What Makes a Game Story Work? because apparently I'm obsessed with questions-as-headlines.)

Organizers Carol Mertz and Mary McKenzie Kelly and their super-cool army of volunteers did a fantastic job of creating and running a high-quality, highly-inclusive game con. More than one person I met commented on the open, friendly, encouraging atmosphere and the extremely helpful takeaways.

Here are some pics!

The expo hall was overwhelmingly dominated by console games, but I stumbled upon this awesome mobile game by developer Bravendary, and since I was tasked with judging games for the Select Award, I gave it my vote. Super Bobbert and the Infinity Tree is a "risk/reward collection game." You play by dragging your finger on the screen or tilting your device to move a pair of telescoping hands up a tree, rescuing kites, balls, and yes, cats--and avoiding collision with tree branches. I gave them some feedback about making the game more accessible to casual players, but I think it's super cute and has great potential. I'm excited to see two developers of color bringing something new to the table.

IMG_0054
Developer Philip Hayes demo-ing Super Bobbert.

One of the most interesting talks I attended was the fireside chat between Leah "Gllty" Hayes, a Street Fighter e-sports champion and Jason Li, a longtime fan and competitor in fighting games. Hayes first learned to play in the arcades of her youth here in St. Louis and is from nearby St. Charles. I knew nothing about fighting game culture and found her insights into the differences between U.S. and Japanese subcultures fascinating. For example, in Japan, gamers might be somewhat hostile to those outside the homogenous Japanese culture, but they are very supportive of women learning to game.

IMG_0042

Here's a demo of a game in development called Stepsisters. It's based on the darker, Grimm's fairy tale version of Cinderella, so the object is to, um, get your toes cut off in order to fit your foot into the glass slipper, marry the prince, and win the game. I feel kind of conflicted about it, but I was schooled on feminist references to classic fairytales in the style of Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber. What do you think?

IMG_0034
Created by students from Bradley University. Pictured here: Warren Guiles, who's in St. Louis this summer interning with Graphite Labs, and Jake Velicer. 
IMG_0035
Creepy, or cool? You tell me.

In the category of "That talk you wish you hadn't been late for" is Kevin Snow's presentation on accessibility in games, but I made up for it with a one-on-one afterward, and I managed to snap a pic of this super-helpful collection of resource links.

IMG_0036

Next is a couple of guys down from Chicago, reps from a student-run studio at DePaul University. I was drawn to their table because they had a bunch of books on display, and book/game crossovers are something I would like to see much more of at game cons. They used fish for controllers, so even though I'm not into fighting games, I had to play this one.

IMG_0045
Josh Delson of JDE, for Junior Development Experience.
IMG_0050
The game is called Sashimi Slammers.

One of the cool things about attending a game con in your own town is running into former students--which happened a lot! It was great to see so many game design majors from Webster University representing. Here's Sarah Brill, showing off a game she helped create through her summer internship with local developer Graphite Labs.

IMG_0058
Sarah created art for Compost Conundrum, an educational game about the value of garden composting.

Another Webster face in the crowd was my friend and former colleague Rob Santos, there showing off a unique game interface. You communicate with a spirit through a Quija Board to uncover a mystery in the game Good Luck. The planchette lights up over letters on the board, allowing the spirit to relate the tale.

IMG_0056
The creativity on display here is why students rave about Rob as a teacher.

I think I might have been the oldest presenter at this youthful con, but it's OK. I just told everyone the reason my hair is this color is because I'm a Targaryen.

IMG_0040
I chose "she" as my pronoun sticker only because "She Who Must Be Obeyed" wasn't an option.

Now in the headline I promised you something about a Big Flashback Event, and here it is. Some of you know last summer I moved back to the Midwest after nearly 20 years away. This con was at my alma mater.

IMG_0033
My dorm from 1989-90. Back then it wasn't emblazoned with the school's name.
IMG_0032
I staffed this cashier booth when the garage first opened. It's now undergoing renovation, and maybe I am, too.

To conclude this pic-laden recap, I've presented at and/or attended big cons like GDC, Casual Connect, AWP, and PNWA. But this is one of my favorites for the inclusivity, friendliness, and hometown vibe.