Cats Feed

It's Time to Honor the Pets Who've Kept Us COVID Company

Chaco_portrait

By Lisa Brunette

It's been a long, hard year with this COVID situation, and let's face it: We couldn't have done it without our pets. 

While our coworkers went from the living, breathing human beings we interacted with on a daily basis to talking heads on a Zoom screen, Rover and Boots became ever-present reminders of the value of physical touch. They rested their heads in our laps, distracted us with their antics, kept our feet warm, offered a reassuring purr and cuddle. Especially for people living alone, this source of daily joy and unconditional love has been nothing short of a lifesaver.

So it's time to honor them, and what better way than with a cool modern portrait?

Chaco's been with us for about five years now, and I'm surprised to admit that we had zero framed photos of him in our house. Of course we take plenty - my recent treatise on ol' kittypants is just a small, representative sampling - but I just hadn't gotten around to framing any. And maybe it's the utilitarian Midwesterner in me - what do you need a picture of your pet for when he's right here in front of you everyday? But as it turns out, a spankin' chi-chi portrait of Chaco was exactly the thing I didn't know I needed in my life until I had one.

Chaco_portrait2

I mean, have you seen anything better? This picture makes me laugh every time I look at it. We hung it in our dining room, where I'm amused by it several times a day.

I know you're green with envy, but I'm about to cure your jealousy: You can get one of these portraits of your pet, too!

In honor of our wonderful animal companions, Cat in the Flock is happy to offer our readers 15% off these stylish, custom pet portraits. Just use the code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout.

Here's a sample from the makers, West & Willow, this time with a dog as subject, and a white background. They have several background choices as well as different options for the frame.

White-bk

To get your portrait with the 15% discount, all you need to do is use this link to head over to West & Willow, and then use the promo code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout. A few notes:

  • Yes, you can get a portrait for any kind of pet, whether bird, iguana, guinea pig, etc.
  • If you have two or three pets and want a group portrait of them, no problem.
  • West & Willow will work with you to create a pet memorial, if that's what you need.
  • No, you can't get human-subject portraits, even if you keep a human as a pet, ha, ha, ha.
  • Make sure you have a good quality digital photo of your pet before you begin the process. The portrait is crafted with it. We used this one for Chaco.

Chaco

Here's the link again:

West & Willow Pet Portrait - 15% Off!

And don't forget to use the code PAWFRIENDS15 at checkout.

I hope you enjoy your pet portrait as much as we enjoy ours.

Cat in the Flock might receive a commission if you purchase from West & Willow.

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Meet Chaco, the 'Indoor Only' Suburban Farm Cat

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Meet Chaco, the 'Indoor Only' Suburban Farm Cat

Chaco_Feet

By Lisa Brunette

I've had the privilege of sharing my home with a total of four dogs and four cats over the course of my life (though only as many as 3 pets at one time, and those were all cats). Of the lot, Chaco is definitely the most entertaining. As the lot includes a poodle who had the odd habit of 'hanging' his turds on plants instead of depositing them on the ground like a normal pet, that's saying a lot.

Chaco's a special breed called a Devon rex, and they're famously described as "monkeys in cat suits." The breed has an above-average climbing drive. This is evidenced in Chaco's need to get to the highest point in any room, consequences be damned. His only health issue is a torn ACL. The vet said we should probably scale back on his Olympic skiing events.

Chaco_Tree

A cat like this deserves to be spoiled a bit, with faux 'trees' he can climb on, of course. As he had the crazy luck to get adopted by a couple of middle-aged empty nesters, it probably won't surprise you to learn that he eats an only-raw food diet, has a an arsenal of colorful cat toys, and sleeps the day away on a heating pad.

Don't judge us too harshly on that last one, though - his breed lacks a guard coat, so he's covered only in short little corkscrew curls of fine down. He gets mighty cold, easily. It's my duty several times a winter's day to rub his ears between my thumbs and fingers to warm them. He also likes to set his cold toe beans on my neck till they toast up again. He's happiest when he's tucked inside our clothing with us.

Chaco_Vest

The short, curly hair is one of his attributes, though: He's as close to hypoallergenic as you can get in a cat. Which makes him the only cat that doesn't trigger an endless slew of mast cell reactions in me. I'm greatly thankful for this, especially because he's the most affectionate, cuddliest cat I've ever met. 

If you come over to our house, you're likely to get a 'kiss' from Chaco, as his breeder taught him to stick his face right up into yours for a smooch, and we haven't been able to break him of the habit. (Not that we've tried that hard.) He sleeps with us, of course; and he really likes the cleft of my neck between head and shoulder. If that's not available, he plops right down on my head. On more than one occasion I've felt something wet... trickling down my chin... yep. Cat drool.

Chaco_Paw

When we first got Chaco, I hadn't yet figured out what was causing my health problems, and we tried to keep him out of the bedroom in an attempt to ensure a symptom-free night's rest, just in case I did react to him. But when I was staying in an Airbnb during our lengthy wait to move into our current home, Chaco was able to push the double doors open to my bedroom, and there was no keeping him out. He took to it as if to say, There. As it should be.

Speaking of pushing open doors, he can pull them open as well. This is of course not a great trait to have in a cat, especially if you don't want your trash all over the kitchen. 

With his big eyes and ears, he has a bit of an alien look that I find simultaneously adorable and comical. He's especially goofy during play, and one of these days I promise I'll capture on camera one of his totally wacked-out 'gonna git you' poses. For now, though, you can admire him in this hat.

CatintheHat

He's indoor-only because the Devon rex breed is a miniature one, putting him at about a half or even one-third the size of a regular household domestic cat. As much as he likes to think so as he gazes out at the squirrels and rabbits and birds just beyond the window, he wouldn't be able to tough it out there on his own for very long. I mean, besides that torn ACL, he's just a lovable goof with delusions of predatory glory. He wouldn't be good for the birds anyway; a surprisingly sad number of them succumb to house cats as it is, so we don't want Chaco contributing to the problem.

Until we can erect a 'catio,' or somesuch, Chaco must enjoy the outdoors from the safety of his home. Yeah, you should hear him bemoaning the injustice of the situation if we're outside and the windows are open.

Chaco_Window

For such a small guy, he can really strike a commanding presence. Sometimes, when running the day job business plus this blog feels like a lot, I can just pretend that Chaco's the boss. 

Chaco_Boss

Chaco_Boss2

He can often make it hard to work anyway. This is a pretty common thing I've seen in other cats, the drive to distract you while you're working on something important at the computer, but Chaco's definitely the hammiest. It's like he knows exactly how to get me to laugh.

Chaco_ScreenPeek

When we adopted Chaco in 2016, it was with the express purpose of giving my stepson, Zander, the experience of living with a pet, something that was new to him. I totally believed Chaco was for Zander. But then Zander went off to college, and Anthony and I realized Chaco filled a huge empty nest for us.

There was never any question when we made the decision to move to Missouri from Washington state that Chaco would be included in that plan, even though it meant moving him via air flight... and it also meant towing my cat and all his supplies with me through a string of Airbnbs while Anthony readied our house to sell.

Chaco_StLouis

But having Chaco with us was more than worth all that. I hope this doesn't offend you, but I've often preferred the company of my pets to people, and Chaco is no exception. He's very much a part of the fabric of our lives here at the 'farmhouse,' even if he does make it impossible to start seeds indoors (he digs them up) or dry herbs on screens (he treats this as his personal resting spot). 

Chaco_Herbs

He participates in our backyard foraging by munching on the yummy wild garlic we bring inside.

Chaco_Greens

He even watches TV with us in the evenings, though he reacts a bit differently to some of the documentaries than we do.

Chaco_Bird

We're sure he thinks of us as lumbering, somewhat awkward colony mates, whose strange insistence on sleeping at night and remaining active all day must be tolerated. We try to give him the best life we can, because he puts a smile on our faces every day, giving us that warm, cuddly, interspecies connection.

We all agree that some days, the exact right thing to do is curl up in a blanket and let everything else go.

Chaco_Blanket

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Welcome (Virtually) to Our Home for the Holidays!

Xmas_Window

By Lisa Brunette

One of the fun activities Anthony and I participated in pre-COVID-19 was the holiday parlor tour here in St. Louis' Lafayette Square neighborhood. It was a treat to tour historic homes - some dating as far back as before the Civil War - all done up for the holidays. We look forward to a day when such in-person events are possible again. In the meantime, we've given the 116-year-old Dragon Flower Farmhouse a holiday makeover and invite you to tour it from the comfort and safety of your own living room.

Fa-La-La-Llama

Speaking of comfort, the below llama pillow comes out only for the holidays... I'm not sure why a pink llama says Christmas, but it certainly does. As you might have learned from our last post on the living room makeover, we've got complementary colors pink and green in the main downstairs space. Complementary means they're opposites on the color wheel, and that makes them a vibrant pairing, as in the pink pillow on chartreuse here.

Llama pillow

The llama theme is echoed in the Christmas tree, as a key ornament. I've hung this one and a couple of other ornaments behind the tree to make the smallish tree seem a bit grander, as well as fill the blank walls left when I removed an antique leather whip and two vintage family photos that didn't look right as backdrop for ol' tannenbaum.

Xmas_OrnamentWall

The tree is strung with white lights and colors that harmonize with the room's palette: pink, green, white, gold, and natural tones from straw and wood. Rather than spending a lot of money just to color-coordinate a tree, I simply split our ornament collection into two categories, these muted tones and another crop all in primary colors, which fit the smaller tree in the dining room. But before I move onto that room, I want to linger here a bit in the living room, with of course the mantel as the focal point.

This Mantel Moment

Xmas_Mantel

I really love how the mantel looks for the holidays. The candelabra on the left is a vintage 1960s Brutalist design, which I found at a tiny thrift window shop that used to be part of a sweet little café owned and run by two women in Chehalis, Wash. The mercury glass candle holders are from World Market, and the brass deer is an antique mall find. I wish I could say I made the stockings myself, but they're from Etsy. (At least I hung them with care!). Yes, Chaco gets a stocking... what did you expect? Zander has one, too, but he's staying in Seattle for the holidays. 

The cube vase on the left is a collectible piece of memorabilia - a brick from the old St. Louis Arena, a major concert and sporting venue for 70 years before it was imploded in 1999. The other vase is handcrafted by an artist, but I picked it up at an antique mall on the cheap and unfortunately don't know anything about who made it.

Here's a variation on the mantel from 2019, with the Brutalist candelabra replaced with a star hurricane lamp, and the balance shifted.

Mantel 2019

Ornament Lament

Thinking about that Arena brick puts me in the mindset to share this holiday tragedy. You see, I went to a good number of heavy metal concerts at that place back in the day, but one of the acts I did not see was Kiss. I've related the whole story previously on the blog, but basically my parents were super strict sort of beyond reason, and they would not allow me to go to this particular Kiss concert in the late 80s, which would have been something to remember and tell your kids about, you know? What I did have, however, was this amazing Kiss ornament, gifted to me by my friend Alyssa Naumann back in the 90s, after she heard my Kiss concert sob story and wanted to give me something to make up for the loss. 

Kiss Ornament

Yeah, that's a Rock and Roll Over Kiss ornament right there, and you'll notice up above I used past tense: What I did have, however, was this amazing Kiss ornament... Past tense because a day or two after I took this photo, Chaco BROKE it. My wonderful Kiss ornament, which I have looked forward to getting out each Christmas for the past 25 years, on the floor, shattered to bits. Because of the CAT.

Words were said, my friends, and a grudge was held... for at least an hour, anyway. Chaco wormed his way back in pretty quickly, I have to admit.

Sigh. 

Red Tree

Have a Ball

The Kiss ornament was on the 'red' tree in the dining room, where a brighter palette prevails, all inspired by the ironic and iconic Miss Fortunato painting, done by Monica Mason, the wife of an old colleague of mine from the St. Louis Science Center. It was part of a series on circus side show acts; Miss Fortunato is "the luckiest woman in the world," because she's so beautiful, all manner of butterflies flock to her face, as if it's a flower (obscuring her face from the viewer). This painting originated in St. Louis, has traveled with me to Miami, Florida, and Seattle, Wash., and has now returned to just a few blocks from the home where it first hung. It fits well in between the moulding detail.

Here we are, all ready for a small dinner party before the holidays. The wool felt balls are from World Market (I can't help it; I'm a fan), and the turquoise table settings are Fiestaware. The vintage side cabinet is probably from the 1940s and was left behind by the previous owner of my house in Tacoma; I added heavy caster wheels and painted it black (it had been puke pink). The top comes off but was damaged in our last move, alas. The pewter candle holders in the two paneled areas are from my sister, Amy, who had them in her home for many years and then kept them in storage after the glass hurricanes broke and her décor changed. When she saw our dining room, she realized they'd be perfect, and she is right.

Dining Room Xmas

This dining room is actually next up for renovation, as that aforementioned brown paint is on full display here, too, covering all of the window and doorway trim, as well as a chair rail that runs the length of the room, which you can see above. We're thinking about a deep blue-green, as this room faces southeast, gets plenty of light, and could handle a darker hue. I'm considering painting the walls, trim, and the above white cutouts all the same color, for a more dramatic, rich effect. Maybe even the ceiling? What do you think? My brother keeps crying 'earth tones,' but that's not really my jam.

That concludes our virtual tour. Merry Christmas to those of you who celebrate the holiday. And to all, may 2021 bring you peace, happiness, and the freedom and safety to go... maskless!

Note: This post contains an Etsy affiliate link, but all other recommendations are non-sponsored.

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A Peek at Our Peony, and Some Free Plants!

Peony bud

By Lisa Brunette

I've got a short one for you this time - I know; you're probably like, "Really, Lisa? Because you're a big fan of those longform blog posts (TL;DR)." But this time I just want to do two things: 1) Show you our beautifully rehabilitated peony and 2) offer you some free plants.

So the peony had been a sickly, struggling thing for the past three years, and in 2019 I was sure it had finally succumbed to blight. But we mulched around it and decided to give it a chance. Well, this spring, it sprang back to life with great promise, as you can see in the awakening bud above. But peony buds are a really slow tease, taking their time to come to full bloom.

Peony opening

When it finally opened, it was a visual and aromatic treat. While I knew their short-lived but storied flowers were legend, I hadn't realized peonies smelled so good.

Peony 2020

They made for a lovely cut flower when we finally opened up from quarantine here and had the whole fam damly over for Memorial Day. Chaco agreed, and luckily, peonies pose no threat to the kitty. In fact, his taste for the peony water is smart, as the petals have been used to flavor water since antiquity.

Peony with Chaco

Peony: short-lived but spectacular, safe for cats, and, as it turns out, immensely useful for humans. We have such a small bush, with only about five flowers in total, but if we ever get more, we can use the petals in many of the same ways we use rose petals. It's even been used medicinally.

Now for the free plants!

You might recall from a previous post that we have about 100 yellow bearded irises here at the Cat in the Flock farm. As much as we enjoy the sight of them in late spring, they're limited to that, aesthetics. We can't use them because they're toxic to humans, and we can't even bring them into the house as a cut flower because they're toxic to cats, and Chaco is like Mikey in the old Life cereal commercials. 

Iris 2020

So if you're in the St. Louis area, come on by, and I'll give you some free rhizomes. They're done blooming now, and I'm happy to pot them for you to take home. Just email me at this handy link.

See? I told you it'd be short!

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5 Cool Uses for Rose Petals

Knockout Rose Bush 2020
So. Many. Roses.

By Lisa Brunette

We inherited three 'knock out' rose bushes, well established by the time we moved here in 2017. Three is a more than enough for us, especially considering this ridiculously common ornamental doesn't produce rose hips, and most pollinators don't seem to take much notice of it, either, except for the domesticated European honeybee. We removed one of the rose bushes last fall and trimmed back the remaining two, and lo and behold, this spring they exploded with more blooms than we'd ever seen before.

The roses are pretty, for sure, and they seem to be more fragrant this year, too. But we as a species are far past the point where we can allow sizable real estate to be taken up by living statues, no matter how pretty or fragrant. Should the knock out rose go - or stay? On the plus side, it was cultivated to be disease-resistant and hardy, and it's clearly flourishing even though we haven't done anything to it besides trim it back and mulch around it.

But it isn't a native, not like the wild roses that have evolved in tandem with local pollinators. So for example, caterpillars haven't had eons to adapt methods of getting past the rose's resistance to them (and it's been bred to further resist them anyway). So the remaining question for us is: Can we use it?

Rose Petals
Much more useful than just potpourri.

If we can derive some culinary, medicinal, or other human use from this plant, then it warrants its space at Dragon Flower Farm. I knew from reading the novel Like Water for Chocolate that you can eat rose petals, so I started from that assumption. Tita's famous quail-and-rose-petal sauce recipe aside, I found and tested five cool uses for America's national flower.

#1 Just toss the petals into a salad.

Maybe this is obvious, but if they're edible, you know, you can simply add them to your mixed greens and chow down. Don't use petals that have been sprayed with pesticides, of course. We're 100 percent organic, and you could be, too. If your rose petals are clean, give this a try; they're high in vitamin C. Some say the more fragrant they are, the better the taste. We've tossed them into mixes with baby kale, shredded carrot, sunflower seeds, and green olives, and they're delicious.

#2 Pickle them.

I love pickled food, so pickled rose petals immediately intrigued me when I saw this recipe over at the Martha Stewart blog. I followed it to a T and have to say pickled rose petals is my new go-to. My only complaint is that the recipe - part of one of those slideshow thingies - ends abruptly without mentioning whether or not you have to refrigerate the petals or how long they'll last. FYI, I put mine in the fridge, and three weeks later, they're still fine.

Rose Petal Products
The sum total of my rose-petal haul.

#3 Make rose water.

Rose water might make you think of your grandmother's perfume, at least if you're as old as I am, but it's so much more. You can use it in food dishes, as a culinary accompaniment, in yogurt lassi, and, of course, as a refreshing, non-chemical fragrance. It's easy to make, too: Just pour boiling water over rose petals in a jar and seal, and you've got it. Again, especially with the outdoor temps here now into the 90s, I keep mine in the fridge.

Rose Water
It's lovely to look at and smell, but useful, too.

#4 Infuse - and naturally dye - your vinegar.

If you've been following along with this blog regularly, you've already seen me use both violets and lilacs to dye and infuse vinegar. I was curious to see what would happen with rose petals, and woo hoo, our favorite little valentine didn't disappoint. Note: I recommend using a high-quality vinegar for this, organic and containing the naturally occurring organism referred to as "the mother." Why? Because you're going to want to eat a lot of it, making salad dressing and adding it as you cook, and your body will thank you for it.

Rose Vinegar
It's like Barbie vinegar!

#5 Brew rose petals as tea.

I realize you might think of this as a repeat of the rose water above, but it's meant to be more medicinal than beautifying, and rather than drink rose petal tea on its own, I've opted to pair it with another plant.

First, I want to introduce you to a concept called the "Doctrine of Signatures," which I initially heard of from the author Tammi Hartung of Desert Canyon Farm but have subsequently come across in a variety of sources. This is an ancient tradition that suggests what a plant looks like tells you what it's good for. For roses, that means the heart-shaped, velvety red petals promote heart opening. So Tita's rose-petal sauce wasn't just fictional license.

Roses have also been used to soothe the stomach and bring on a sense of calm. I decided to pair them with the definitely heart-shaped violet leaves growing here in profusion, and it was fun to find out that violet leaves have been used to promote heart health, too, also backing up the doctrine of signatures.

Here's how you make my 'Heart's Ease' tea blend. First, dry the petals, which you can manage in a dehydrator or by spreading them out in a wide, shallow basket. I layered them with the violet leaves in a dryer rack I fashioned out of netting and a garden flat box.

Violet Leaves Drying

Of course, Chaco was really grateful for this lovely bed I'd created for him.

Chaco on Violet Leaves

Once I removed the cat, started over with new violet leaves, added the rose petals, and placed the whole rack in a place where Chaco couldn't get to it, it took about two weeks for the mixture to fully dry. I then placed it into clean jars, labeled with both ingredients, the suggested use, and the date.

So, what's the verdict? Are these multiple uses for rose petals enough to justify keeping the knock out? What others can you suggest? List them in the comments below! Another option is to replace the knockout with a native rose or another one that will provide us with more rose hips...

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